Planning & Strategy Development

Ready to bring Move Your Way to your community? First, identify your campaign team and lead agency.

  • The campaign team is the core group of people who will guide your local Move Your Way campaign activities and initiatives from planning through implementation.
  • The lead agency — usually a government public health office or health-related organization — is the institutional home of the community campaign.

Working solo or without a lead agency? No problem — you can adapt the tips and resources in the playbook to build a campaign on the scale that works for you.

Now it’s time to map out your strategies for success. Plan to spend 3 to 5 months in the planning and strategy development phase.

During this phase, the campaign team will oversee the planning process, delegate tasks, and secure funding and other support. 

Take these steps during the planning phase:

Get familiar with Move Your Way

Before you start planning, get to know all the Move Your Way Campaign Materials. Move Your Way is the promotional campaign for the second edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.

The Physical Activity Guidelines provides recommendations about the amount and types of activity adults and children need to stay healthy. The Move Your Way campaign turns these recommendations into easy-to-understand physical activity guidance for adults, families, and health professionals, including fact sheets, posters, videos, and interactive tools.

Think about the resources that will be most useful for your campaign. Which materials will resonate most with people in your community? Will you need materials in English, Spanish, or both? Start imagining where you can distribute and share materials locally.

Tips

  • Take our Move Your Way resources for a test drive! Use the Move Your Way Activity Planner to build your own weekly physical activity plan, or watch the Move Your Way Videos together with your campaign team. It’s much easier to promote materials you’ve used yourself.
  • Get inspiration from the initial pilot communities. Read this blog post and watch this webinar recording to learn successful strategies from the community campaigns in Southern Nevada and Jackson, Mississippi.

Resources

Set priorities, goals, and metrics

The national Move Your Way campaign aims to help people live healthier lives through physical activity — but you can set unique, place-based goals and priorities for your local community campaign.

To guide strategy development, sit down with your campaign team and decide on:

  • Priority populations you want to reach, like Spanish speakers or school-aged children
  • Goals you want to work toward, like boosting local youth sports participation
  • Objectives to help you reach those goals, like offering free or low-cost youth sports teams at local rec centers
  • Metrics you’ll use to measure success, like event attendance, engagement on social media, or new partnerships

You can continue to refine and adjust these goals and priorities throughout the planning phase, but it’s helpful to have guidance in place as you search for partners and delegate tasks.

Tips

  • When you’re choosing priority populations, think of groups in your community that are less likely to be meeting the Physical Activity Guidelines and that have fewer services available to them. This will help you maximize your impact.
  • Plan ahead for using metrics and gathering data. Check out the Evaluate your challenges and successes section for evaluation tips and resources.

Delegate key tasks

Based on input from our pilot communities, ODPHP recommends delegating tasks in the following key areas to prepare for the campaign:

  • Partnerships — engaging with influential local organizations and leaders to build support and coordinate physical activity efforts 
  • Media setting strategy for using social media and other channels to spread the word about your campaign
  • Events planning your launch and other community events to engage local audiences and get people moving
  • Materials — selecting, customizing, and distributing Move Your Way materials to promote campaign events and initiatives

But remember, every community is different! Organize and delegate your tasks however works best for you. If you’re working solo, choose priority tasks to lead yourself and ask partner organizations to take the lead on others. If you have lots of people pitching in, you can form campaign committees to tackle each key area just make sure to coordinate efforts.

Tips

  • To help decide on key tasks or recruit people to serve on committees, hold a community roundtable event. Invite local public health professionals and community members from various fields and ask for their input.
  • Create a shared calendar to plan and track committee meetings and other campaign events and activities.

Resources

  • Use or adapt our Recruitment Email to ask people to join your campaign efforts and work on different priority tasks.
  • Follow the Master Task List [PDF - 947.8 KB] to guide priority tasks in the months before and after the launch event. If you don’t have committees, delegate priority tasks to members of your campaign team.

Build your team

Once you have your core campaign team in place, brainstorm ways to collaborate with partners in your community. Which local organizations have similar goals? How can you use Move Your Way to work with them?

Make lists of potential partners, including:

  • Traditional partners, like schools, worksite wellness programs, and community-based organizations related to physical activity
  • Non-traditional partners, like police departments, local chambers of commerce, and religious organizations
  • Organizations that work on related issues, like preventing chronic diseases or building walkable neighborhoods
  • Influential community members who can serve as local champions for the campaign

If you already have a coalition of local partners, work to strengthen it by adding new partners and increasing engagement with members of your existing coalition.

Then do some legwork to choose the most promising opportunities:

  • Designate a point person to reach out to key contacts.
  • Attend upcoming community meetings and events to network and talk about potential collaborations.
  • Regroup with your campaign team to decide which new partnerships to pursue.

Tips

  • Start by contacting people you know. Networking is key to successful community campaigns, so reach out to your contacts in local government, nonprofits, and private business who may be willing to get involved with Move Your Way.
  • The connections you’re making through Move Your Way could last a lifetime — but only if you maintain them. Remember to send thank you notes to your partners to let them know how much you appreciate their support.

Resources

Secure funding and volunteers

Planning and implementing a Move Your Way community campaign is a big undertaking, and you’ll need sufficient funding and volunteer support to pull it off. But when people hear about the great work you’re doing, they’ll be happy to help!

Decide what you need to be successful and start asking for it:

  • Create a campaign budget that includes costs for event venues, supplies, vendors, printing, advertising, and campaign team salaries.
  • Apply for grants from government public health agencies and nonprofits at the national, state, or local level. Check out the resources below for sample grant language.
  • Ask local businesses to donate or lend items for events, like event space, food, sports equipment, and prizes for giveaways.
  • Recruit volunteers to help with campaign activities, like taking photos or registering attendees at the launch event.

Tips

  • Ask local colleges if their students need volunteer opportunities. Student volunteers can help run events. They may also be able to contribute skills like video production and graphic design.
  • When you ask for donations, explain how they’ll be used. Paint a picture of the event or material and how it will impact real people in your community. People are more likely to donate if they can picture what they’re funding.
  • If you’re approaching existing donors, frame the campaign as an exciting new project — and a reason to renew their support.
  • Offer to add donor logos to your campaign materials in exchange for donations.
  • Ask everyone involved in your campaign to help out with networking — personal contacts are more likely to donate time and money. Encourage them to reach out in person and on social media.

Resources

Plan a launch event

Your launch event introduces your campaign to the whole community. Plan an event that will raise awareness about Move Your Way and get people excited about physical activity.

Brainstorm ideas for your launch event, including:

  • Local venues, like parks, rec centers, or schools
  • Must-haves for your location, like convenient public transportation
  • Speakers and special guests to help lead activities, like local athletes or elected officials
  • Event activities, like a bike ride or an obstacle course
  • Vendors who can provide other services, like face painting or nutrition counseling
  • Ways to use campaign materials, like handing out fact sheets to attendees
  • Ways to promote the event, like social media or radio ads

Decide on a launch event plan with your campaign team. Then delegate tasks like sending invitations, confirming speakers, and booking a venue — and make sure to set deadlines so everything stays on track.

Tips

  • Make your event accessible. Choose a venue that’s welcoming for people with disabilities and families with kids of all ages.
  • Offer lower-intensity activity options — like a 1K walk alongside a 5K run — to be more welcoming to older adults or anyone just starting to get active.
  • Plan for the weather. If you’re launching in summer, consider hosting some or all of the event in an air-conditioned space. If your event is outdoors, choose a rain date.
  • Mix it up! Offer a range of activities to help people find things they really enjoy. Consider fun group activities like Zumba and line dancing, and choose things that work for people with diverse abilities.

Resources